In my previous post, I mentioned that I have a slightly enormous backlog of photos to share on the blog and that seems like a perfect excuse for a photo post. But which trip to choose? The Winter getaway to Queenscliff? The tour down an old coal mine in Autumn? Perhaps I could go back a little further to the fabulous Great Ocean Road trip of 2016?

As I said: a slightly enormous backlog of photos.

I thought about all of those options for a while and decided to go with something completely different.

The thing is, we’re fortunate to live in a rather beautiful region of the state and I love taking advantage of this fact. With such gorgeousness on tap, it’s easy to head off for a half-hour walk ten minutes from home and still find plenty of things to photograph.

Of course, this may have a lot to do with my compulsion to take photos at all possible times… but I’m pretty sure the fabulous surroundings help.

So let me take you back to a couple of weeks ago, when we drove a whole ten minutes to walk a section of the Warburton Rail Trail near Launching Place.

I’m determined to find the best sections of the rail trail for walks. It’s a long trail and there are plenty of places where it’s just dull, such as long, straight stretches of path alongside roads with not much in the way of interesting distractions. I’m sure this was entirely practical when it was a railway but it’s not that enticing for a walk.

Luckily, the section near Launching Place is a particularly marvellous one with plenty of wildlife. At one point, we stood near a boggy patch listening to an orchestra of frogs who refused to reveal themselves for photographic purposes. I could have taken a photo of the bog, I suppose, but it didn’t have much in the way of redeeming features being, as it was, a bog.

Fortunately, the birds were more forthcoming when it came to coming forth.

I spent quite a while here, chasing the birds through my viewfinder and hoping one would pose long enough for a photo. Blue wrens are such adorable little creatures but they rarely manage to hold still for longer than a nanosecond or two.

Less adorable but still good enough for a photo when the backdrop is so lovely: a cow.

The path wound its way past many a farm paddock full of cattle and horses posing in bucolic fashion in stunning landscapes. At this point, it deviated from the main road, too, which added to the sense of heading into the middle of nowhere.

And when you’re miles from civilisation, surely this is the sign you are looking for.

Simple advertising at its best.

We turned back without visiting the grocery store as I’d just put some bread mix in the bread machine and wanted to get back before it had completed the dough cycle. It didn’t even matter that we were simply re-tracing our route – it meant we were able to admire the scenery from a different perspective. And the wildlife continued to be on hand in the most photogenic of places.

My main complaint about kookaburras around here is that they never sit in gum trees. They love fences, powerlines, any other type of tree (and on one memorable occasion, the roof of a toilet block). When I see an actual kookaburra in an actual gum tree, I celebrate the occasion. And take a photo of it.

Finally, the best thing about Australia as the season turns to Spring: wattle.

It is the most glorious sight. Everywhere you look, yellow flowers are bursting into life and brightening your day. It’s impossible to look up at yellow wattle flowers against a bright blue sky and feel miserable. It does good things for your soul.

I always think it’s worth taking a walk around your neighbourhood. There’s something appealing about the slower pace – you notice little details you never see when you’re driving on your way to somewhere else. Plus, it’s difficult to stop and take photos every two seconds when you’re driving.

I hope you enjoyed tagging along on this modest local adventure. Which adventure would you like to see next? Queenscliff, the Great Ocean Road, or the coal mine? Let me know in the comments below!

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